Iceland Mag

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Iceland Mag

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  • Weather

    Sarcastic weather outlook: Summer canceled. Instead we'll get three extra months of fall

    By Staff

    Rain, rain, and then some more rain This long term weather forecast for Reykjavík doesn't look too good! Fortunately it´s not real. Photo/Ingþór Ingólfsson, Facebook

    While the calendar and migratory birds insist summer has already arrived the actual weather outside our window does not agree. We have yet to get one decent summer day with sun and temperature in the double digits in Reykjavík. This has led some locals to worry we are in for one of the notorious rainy summers people remember from their youth.

    Read more: Photo of the Day: In Iceland the wind blows from all directions, simultaneously!

    A local man, Ingþór Ingólfsson, created the above "long-term weather forecast" for Reykjavík which included only two days of sun. The photo immediately went viral on Icelandic social media. Some people failed to recognize that the image was actually a joke, and assumed it was the official weather forecast from the Icelandi Meteorological Office. According to the local newspaper Morgunblaðið the IMO had to respond to desperate or outraged locals who presumably wanted an explanation or some assurance that the forecast was not set in stone.

    Ingþór told Morgunblaðið that the forecast was supposed to be a joke, designed to cheer people up, since the weather had failed to do so. "I don't know if I need to apologize to the IMO, for having forced them to respond to frustrated people."

    So far Ingþór has predicted the weather correctly. The skies have been overcast with rain for the past several days. However, the IMO is now telling us to expect dry weather, and even some sun tomorrow, Wednesday and Thursday. Then it's back to pouring rain!

     

  • Weather

    Photo of the Day: In Iceland the wind blows from all directions, simultaneously!

    By Staff

    Icelandic weather in a nutshell Sometimes it feels the wind is blowing from all directions, and sometimes it actually does just that! Photo/Ragnar Sveinbjörnsson, Facebook

    It is a well known fact that the weather in Iceland is unpredictable: You can expect to sample all types of weather, and even all the seasons before noon. It might be sunny and nice one moment, but sleet and snow the next, shifting to storm and rain, only to revert back to a sunny summer day. 

    Read more: Is it winter, spring or summer? The weather doesn't make sense until you realize Iceland has 12 seasons

    At the root of this phenomena is the wind, and the Icelandic wind is famous for its insistance on upending the laws of nature, for example by helping waterfalls to run upside-down. It can even blow from two opposite directions - at the same time!

    Read more: Videos, photos: Waterfalls in Iceland are sometimes in no mood for gravity

    The following photograph was captured by a local man in Bolungarvík, a small fishing village in the Westfjords, showing how the wind blows the flags of his neighbors in all different directions simultaneously. 

    We at Iceland Magazine would like to use this opportunity to remind our readers to bring windproof clothing to Iceland! 

  • Accidents, Search and Rescue

    Search for man who fell into Ölfusá river early Sunday morning called off due to bad weather

    By Staff

    Ölfusárbrú bridge The man was seen jumping from the bridge early Sunday morning. Photo/Ernir

    ICE-SAR and Police in South Iceland have scaled back the search for a man who was seen jumping into Ölfusá river early Sunday morning. Poor weather conditions forced ICE-SAR and Police to call off the search yesterday evening. The search will only be resumed on Wednesday after the weather has calmed down.

    A witness saw a man climb onto the railing on the Ölfusá-brigde in the town of Selfoss, early Sunday morning, and then jump into the river. The incident took place at ca 3:00 am Sunday morning. Police has not provided any details on the identity of the man or the lead-up to the incident.

    Read more: ICE-SAR, Police search for man who fell into Ölfusá river in Selfoss town, South Iceland

    Members of ICE-SAR companies in South Iceland and the Capital Region as well as a helicopter from the Coast Guard participated in the search on Sunday morning. The search was scaled down on Monday as hope to find the man alive waned. .

    The focus of the search is downstream from Selfoss and the river's estuary.  According to the local news site Vísir more than 80-90 members of ICE-SAR were participating in the search at 9:00 when the Coast Guard helicopter was called back. Boats and drones have been used used to search the river and its banks.

  • Accidents, Search and Rescue

    Two Minnesota travelers drowned while fishing at Þingvallavatn lake on Sunday

    By Staff

    Þingvallavatn lake The lake covers a larg part of the Þingvellir rift valley. Photo/Pjetur

    Two foreign travelers drowned in Þingvallavatn lake on Sunday. The people, a couple in their 40s who lived in La Crescent in Minnesota, were fishing on the lake when the accident took place. According to witnesses and police the woman appears to have lost her footing and fallen in the deep water. The man dove into the water in an attempt to rescue her, but was overcome by the cold of the water. Attempts to resuscitate the people failed and they were pronounced dead at the National University Hospital in Reykjavík.

    The accident took place at Villingavatnsós, the estuary of Villingavatnsá river which empties into Þingvallavatn. 

    Fly-fishermen on their first fishing trip outside US  

    Þingvallavatn lake accident
    Brian and Janet The Minnesota couple were in their late 40s Photo/Star Tribune screenshot

    The Minnesota newspaper The Star Tribune has identified the people as Janet Veit and Brian Schumacher. Brian was a histologist at the Gundersen Health Clinic in La Crosse, while Janet was a veterinarian at a local animal hospital. Both were avid fishermen and fly-fishing enthusiasts. This was their first fishing trip outside the US. Þingvallavatn lake is renowned for its trout and Arctic char populations. The Star Tribune reports that Janet had caught the biggest fish of her life at Þingvallavatn, a 6 pound brown trout.

    Two local man who was staying in nearby cabins with their families saw the accident and rushed to the scene to retrieve the people out of the water. Attempts at resuscitation failed.

    “We take odd comfort in the fact that they died together, one thinking they were going to be saved, the other thinking they were going to be the savior,” the sister of Janet told the Star Tribune. 

    Note: The Star Tribune and local media offer a different account of the events leading up to the accident. According to the Star Tribune Schumacher fell in the water with Veit diving in to safe him. Local media in Iceland both Police and witnesses say it was the woman who fell in first.

    Local media also did not identify the victims by name or nationality out of respect for the wishes of their families. It was only after the Star Tribune had covered the accident that the victims were identified by name in local media

  • Accidents, Search and Rescue

    ICE-SAR, Police search for man who fell into Ölfusá river in Selfoss town, South Iceland

    By Staff

    The bridge over Ölfusá river Driving the Ring Road to South Iceland from Reykjavík you cross the Ölfusá bridge at the outskirts of Selfoss, just before entering town. Photo/Ernir

    A large search is underway at Ölfusá river in South Iceland after a witness saw a man jump into the river on the bridge over the river at the outskirts of Selfoss. 

    Members of ICE-SAR companies in South Iceland and the Capital Region as well as a helicopter from the Coast Guard participate in the search which began at three in the morning. A witness saw a man climb onto the railing on the Ölfusá-brigde in the town of Selfoss, and then jump into the river. 

    The focus of the search is downstream from Selfoss and the river's estuary.  According to the local news site Vísir more than 70 members of ICE-SAR were participating in the search at 9:00 when the Coast Guard helicopter was called back. Nothing is known about the man, his identity or motive for jumping in the river.

    The search will continue today. 

  • Weather

    Is it winter, spring or summer? The weather doesn't make sense until you realize Iceland has 12 seasons

    By Staff

    Pretty much sums it up! Iceland does not have 4 seasons like most normal countries. Photo/Iceland Magazine

    In the past few days the weather here in Iceland has shifted violently from spring to winter and then back to spring, with a couple of hail/sleet/snow showers, then back to spring which looks like summer, only to revert back to winter. Don't worry: You're not caught in some terrifying Black Mirror episode: This is totally normal! Wild weather changes are the norm, rather than the exception in Iceland: You never know what you will get.

    The old joke is that if you don't like the weather in Iceland, just wait five minutes and it'll have changed. It's not a joke!

    To help our readers make sense of the Icelandic weather we at Iceland Magazine put together this handy little chart to identify the season. Note that there is no way to say how long each season is, when it starts or when it ends, and they are not all equally long. Second summer, for example, tends to be just one or two week long. Moreover, the seasons refuse to obey even this very lax schedule: Second summer, for example, can pop up unexpectedly anytime in September or even October, fighting with the Second mudseason: But that's the beauty of it! The excitement and surprise. 

    We are currently (mid May) experiencing the drawn-out back and forth between the muddy late winter and actual spring. Soon we'll even see some proper summer weather. 

    12 seasons of Iceland, spring edition
    12 seasons of Iceland Soon we might experience real summer - finally! PhotoIcelandMag

     

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